Vanguard Dividend Funds List

By Adam Jusko, ProudMoney.com, adam@proudmoney.com

Earning dividends on their investments is a goal for many investors, especially those who are in or nearing retirement. Vanguard is a popular funds company, due in particular to the low expense ratios (i.e., fees) of most of its funds. Below we offer a list of Vanguard dividend mutual funds and exchange-traded funds (ETFs), with a short summary that will shed some light on how they differ. (If a mutual fund and ETF are essentially the same in terms of holdings and investing goals, they are listed together.)

  • VDAIX (Vanguard Dividend Appreciation Index Fund) and VIG (Vanguard Dividend Appreciation ETF) – Index fund or ETF that tracks the performance of the Nasdaq US Dividend Achievers Select Index, consisting of companies that have a history of increasing dividends. Top holdings include Microsoft, Walmart, Johnson & Johnson, PepsiCo, and McDonald’s.
  • VYM (Vanguard High Dividend Yield ETF) and VHDYX (Vanguard High Dividend Yield Index Fund) – These Vanguard funds have the same stocks in their baskets, but the ETF has lower costs. Both track the performance of the FTSE High Dividend Yield Index, which includes stocks of companies generally characterized by high dividend yields. These slower-growing companies generally offer high dividend yields but may not provide as high of a total return in a bull market. Income-focused fund is likely to be attractive to investors who have a long-term investment goal and a tolerance for stock market volatility. Top holdings include JPMorgan Chase, Exxon Mobil, Johnson & Johnson, Wells Fargo, and Chevron.

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Brex Visa Corporate Credit Card Review

By Adam Jusko, ProudMoney.com, adam@proudmoney.com

The Brex Visa Corporate Card is a card that aims to give startup companies fast access to credit without the need for a personal guarantee from a company founder or top executive. Many small business credit cards do require such a personal guarantee, so the Brex Visa could be attractive to startup businesses.

Seems To Target Mostly Tech Startups

However, Brex seems to mainly be targeting tech startups that have good-sized investments from venture capitalists or other deep-pocketed backers, meaning their ideal customer probably has a good cash position even if the company as a whole doesn’t have a credit history for Brex to consider. In other words, they’re probably not going to approve a local startup restaurant owner in Minnesota. (Or wherever outside of Silicon Valley.)

In fact, some of Brex’s own backers are tech-focused venture capitalists or individuals, including two PayPal founders, Peter Thiel and Max Levchin.

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